The traditional System i programming model is simple — key the code into a source member, compile it, and call the generated program; there is a one-to-one relationship between the source member and the program object. By comparison, ILE is a scary place, full of subprocedures, service programs, modules, binding directories, and binder language — to say nothing of activation groups, bind by copy, and bind by reference. It is easy to see why most programmers approach ILE with some trepidation ...

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